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Meet the Instructors


Caitlin Harvey

Caitlin Harvey

Ph.D. candidate in History

Caitlin studies the political and social history of Britain, America, and their colonies since 1870. She is especially interested in the spread of social legislation across Britain’s settlement empire (Canada, New Zealand, Australia, South Africa, and often, the United States) between 1880 and 1930.

Before coming to Princeton in 2015, Caitlin completed an undergraduate degree at Western University (Canada), a Master’s degree at Oxford (UK), and a stint teaching English in France.

Teal Arcadi

Teal Arcadi

Ph.D. candidate in History

Teal studies economic and social history in the United States from the Civil War era to the present. He is particularly interested in the political economy of rural spaces, and his current research examines capitalist transformations in the American hinterland in the mid twentieth century.

Teal has a Master’s degree in history from Princeton University, where he is currently a PhD candidate. He also received an AB summa cum laude in history from Cornell University. Between undergraduate and graduate study, he worked in public policy in New York City.

Rob Konkel

Rob Konkel

Ph.D. candidate in History

Rob is interested in global economic history in the twentieth century. His dissertation project examines the development of trade policies in the interwar period, as part of a broader attempt to understand efforts to imagine, create, and manage the global economy.

Before coming to Princeton, Rob completed a bachelor’s degree at the University of Saskatchewan and a master’s degree at Oxford University. He also spent several years working for the Saskatchewan Teachers’ Federation before starting at Princeton.


Miles

Miles Macallister

Ph.D. candidate in History

Miles studies the British Empire in the long nineteenth century, with a special interest in its relationship with other colonial powers. He is interested in global diplomatic history, but through lenses provided by the histories of technology, capitalism, racism, and migration.

Previously, Miles graduated from the London School of Economics (BSc Government and History, First Class Honours, 2013) and Wolfson College, Cambridge (MPhil Early Modern History, Distinction, 2014). He has also worked in the UK Renewable Energy sector, and maintains a keen interest in environmental issues.

Niharika Yadav

Niharika Yadav

Ph.D. candidate in History

Niharika studies global genealogies of political ideas (ideologies), institutions and practices in the modern world, with a particular focus on 19th and 20th century South Asia. Her dissertation project examines languages of socialism in western and northern India by situating them within the distinct cultural and political formations of these regions as well as in relation to global historical conjunctures. Like her co-instructors, the actors in Niharika’s research were engaged in a global debate about the nature and trajectories of capitalism in their time.

Before joining the PhD program in History at Princeton University, Niharika received undergraduate (B.A. Honors), Masters and M.Phil. (Modern Indian History) degrees in History from Delhi University. She has also worked as a research intern at a state run museum and as a teaching assistant at a private liberal arts university in New Delhi.

Felice

Felice M. Physioc

Ph.D. candidate in History

Felice has been interested in how people and information move ever since she experienced firsthand the intricacies and anxieties of managing a media company’s social platforms and online content. Working within the confines of the changing nature of the world’s wieldy communication industry in Buenos Aires, Argentina for four years, she decided that our contemporary plight merited historical investigation, and went back to graduate school. She completed a two-year dual master’s degree in International and World History at Columbia University and the London School of Economics before beginning her Ph.D. at Princeton University in 2015.

Felice’s dissertation explores the world of publishing and informationbook circulation from the port of Río de la Plata, through the Andes, and towards the Pacific outlet of Lima in the latter half of the eighteenth century. Harnessing her skills and interest in networks and information flows, combined with a rich and fascinating historiography of the Andes, her project will use the latest tools in the digital humanities to visualize the movement of knowledgebooks and people in a tumultuous and transformative moment in Latin American history.