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CB22.1x: The Ancient Greek Hero

Fall 2013

§1. My words of advice here are intended especially for those who have never read any ancient Greek literature – even in translation – and who have no background in ancient Greek history or art. For those of you who find yourselves in this category – and I know you are the vast majority – my advice is meant to support you, encourage you, and to cheer you on. For those of you who are familiar with some or even most aspects of Greek literature, I suggest that you read my pointers anyway, since they will show you how the readings are organized.

§2. The project is divided into 24 units. These units are called "hours" because they match the 24 hours of direct contact time I spend with students in the Harvard University classroom. 

§3. These 24 hours match the chapters of an open-access (free) online book that comes with the course. This e-book is called The Ancient Greek Hero in 24 Hours. From here on, I will call this book simply "h24h." I must stress that you do not have to read all or even most of h24h in order to participate in this project. But I do expect you to consult it systematically as you go through the 24 hours, hour by hour. And you will need to do a slow reading of all the translated texts that I quote in H24H (for example, Text A, Text B, Text C, etc. in Hour 0; Text A, Text B, Text C, etc. in Hour 1; Text A, Text B, Text C, etc. in Hour 2; and so on). Also, you will need to do a fast reading of all the translated texts that I have assigned in the schedule of readings that is coming up in the next paragraph, §4. This schedule is keyed to an open-access (free) online Sourcebook of Original Greek Texts Translated into English that also comes with the course. Before I show you the schedule of readings in §5, let me explain to you what I mean by slow reading and fast reading.

§4. I will start by explaining slow reading in §4A and then move on to fast reading in §4B. For the reading of the following paragraph, §4A, you will have to slow down and take more time. For the reading of the paragraphs after that, §4B, §6, §7, §8, and the Appendix, I hope you will feel free to speed up again.

§4a. So here is the paragraph that needs to slow you down until you have finished reading it (and this paragraph includes the moderately long quotation that you see ahead). Please give yourself about five minutes. That said, let me delve into it. When you do slow reading in this course, you have to slow down and give yourself time to stop and think about what you are reading. You have to do this even if you feel at first that you simply do not have the time to do this. You have to develop a sense for feeling that you really do have the time to stop your reading and to think about what you have just read, allowing yourself to make connections with what you have read earlier. Some people think that philology is the "art" of such slow reading. Classical philologist and philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche1 was one of these people, and he compared the "art" of this "philology" to the art of the goldsmith:

"Philology is that venerable art which demands of its votaries one thing above all: to go aside, to take time, to become still, to become slow – it is a goldsmith’s art and connoisseurship of the word which has nothing but delicate cautious work to do and achieves nothing if it does not achieve it lento. But for precisely this reason it is more necessary than ever today; by precisely this means does it entice and enchant us the most, in the midst of an age of "work," that is to say, of hurry, of indecent and perspiring haste, which wants to "get everything done" at once, including every old or new book – this art does not easily get anything done, it teaches to read well, that is to say, to read slowly, deeply, looking cautiously before and aft, with reservations, with doors left open, with delicate fingers and eyes."2

In closing, let me highlight one big change I made in the translation I just quoted: the translator had written "with delicate eyes and fingers," but Nietzsche in the original German text mentions fingers first and eyes second – in order to drive home his comparison of philology with the art of the goldsmith: when you read slowly, you read with a sense of touch – with "delicate fingers and eyes" (mit zarten Fingern und Augen). We see here an example of reading out of the text instead of reading into the text (I will define these terms in §8).

Now that I am finished with this paragraph, please feel free to go back into a mode of fast reading.

§4b. When you do fast reading of the texts in the Sourcebook, try not to get stuck or bogged down, but push ahead, and keep pushing ahead until you reach a pre-arranged stopping point. If you do not understand something as you are reading it for the first time, just move on. The ancient texts you are reading give you many chances to "get it," even if you cannot seem to "get it" the first time around.

§5. Schedule of readings for "The Ancient Greek Hero":

Hour 0 

  • Read "Introduction to the Book" and "Introduction to Homeric Poetry" in The Ancient Greek Hero in 24 Hours (h24h).
  • Slow reading in h24h: Introduction Texts A through H (= 8 passages)
  • Fast reading in Sourcebook: Iliad scroll I

Hour 1 

  • Slow reading in h24h:  Hour 1 Texts A through C (= 5 passages)
  • Fast reading in Sourcebook: Iliad scroll I

Hour 2

  • Slow reading in h24h: Hour 2 Texts A through E (= 5 passages)
  • Fast reading in Sourcebook: Iliad scrolls III, VI, and IX

Hour 3

  • Slow reading in h24h: Hour 3 Texts A through F (= 6 passages)
  • Fast reading in Sourcebook: Iliad scrolls XV (306–404, 592-746), XVI, XVII (1-69, 188-232, 366-455, 673-751)

Hour 4

  • Slow reading in h24h: Hour 4 Texts A through J (= 10 passages)
  • Fast reading in Sourcebook: Iliad scrolls XVIII, XIX, XX, XXI (1-135, 227-390)

Hour 5

  • Slow reading in h24h: Hour 5 Texts A through M (= 13 passages)
  • Fast reading in Sourcebook: Iliad scrolls XXII, XXIII, XXIV

Hour 6

  • Slow reading in h24h: Hour 6 Texts A through G (= 7 passages)
  • Fast reading in Sourcebook: Iliad scrolls I (repeat), II, III (repeat), IV, V, VI (repeat), VII, VIII

Hour 7

  • Slow reading in h24h: Hour 7 Texts A through G (= 7 passages)
  • "Reading" in h24h: Images A1, B1, A2, B2, C, D, E, F, G, H, I, J, K, L, M, N, O, P, Q
  • Fast reading in Sourcebook: Iliad scrolls IX (repeat), X, XI, XII, XIII, XIV, XV, XVI (repeat)

Hour 8

  • Slow reading in h24h: Hour 8 Texts A through N (= 14 passages)
  • Fast reading in Sourcebook: Iliad scrolls XVII, XVIII (repeat), XIX, XX (repeat), XXI, XXII (repeat), XXIII (repeat), XXIV (repeat)

Hour 9

  • Slow reading in h24h: Hour 9 Texts A through J (= 10 passages)
  • Fast reading in Sourcebook: Odyssey scrolls i-viii.

Hour 10

  • Slow reading in h24h: Hour 10 Texts A through E (= 5 passages)
  • Fast reading in Sourcebook: Odyssey scrolls ix-xvi

Hour 11

  • Slow reading in h24h: Hour 11 Texts A through R (= 18 passages)
  • Fast reading in Sourcebook: Odyssey scrolls xvii-xxiv

Hour 12

  • Slow reading in h24h: Hour 12 Texts A through M (= 13 passages)
  • Fast reading in Sourcebook: Hesiod Theogony lines 1–115; Works & Days lines 1–286

Hour 13

  • Slow reading in h24h: Hour 13 Texts A through L (= 12 passages)
  • Fast reading in Sourcebook: Herodotus Histories 1.1 – 1.91

Hour 14

  • Slow reading in h24h: Hour 14 Texts A through Q (= 19 passages)
  • Fast reading in Sourcebook: Philostratus Hērōikos

Hour 15

  • Slow reading in h24h: Hour 15 Texts A through M (= 13 passages)
  • Fast reading in Sourcebook: Herodotus Histories 1.167 – 9.22

Hour 16

  • Slow reading in h24h: Hour 16 Texts A through G (= 7 passages)
  • Fast reading in Sourcebook: Aeschylus Agamemnon

Hour 17

  • Slow reading in h24h: Hour 17 Texts A through H (= 8 passages)
  • Fast reading in Sourcebook: Aeschylus Libation-Bearers and Eumenides

Hour 18

  • Slow reading in h24h: Hour 18 Texts A through K (= 11 passages)
  • Fast reading in Sourcebook: Sophocles Oedipus at Colonus

Hour 19

  • Slow reading in h24h: Hour 19 Texts A through H (= 8 passages)
  • Fast reading in Sourcebook: Sophocles Oedipus Tyrannus

Hour 20

  • Slow reading in h24h: Hour 20 Texts A through L (= 12 passages)
  • Fast reading in Sourcebook: Euripides Hippolytus

Hour 21

  • Slow reading in h24h: Hour 21 Texts A through I (= 9 passages)
  • Fast reading in Sourcebook: Euripides Bacchae

Hour 22

  • Slow reading in h24h: Hour 22 Texts A1-A6, B, C, D (= 9 passages)
  • Fast reading in Sourcebook: Plato Apology of Socrates

Hour 23

  • Slow reading in h24h: Hour 23 Texts A through H (= 8 passages)
  • Fast reading in Sourcebook: Plato Phaedo

Hour 24

  • Slow reading in h24h: Hour 24 Texts A through J (= 10 passages)
  • Fast reading in Sourcebook: none

§6. If you look back at the schedule in §5, you will see that I am giving you the opportunity to do a fast re-reading of the Homeric Iliad in Hours 6, 7, and 8, after your first try at fast reading in Hours 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5. Over the many years that I have offered this course, I have found that beginners in particular appreciate such an opportunity, since the first try at reading ancient Greek literature, even in translation, seems most intimidating. The second try, I assure you, will build up your confidence.

§7. The texts selected from Greek literature that you see quoted and analyzed in the free book h24h (for example, Text A, Text B, Text C, etc. in Hour 1) are all my own translations. In the free Sourcebook, by contrast, the translations are the work of others (except for the Homeric Hymn to Demeter and the Hesiodic Works and Days, which are my translations). Even in the case of those texts that others have translated, like the Homeric Iliad and Odyssey of Samuel Butler, I have adjusted the wording in many ways. The highlighting of parts of the translations in the Sourcebook indicates that the highlighted parts are borrowed from my own translations in h24h.

§8. Each analysis of each one of the selected texts that I translate in h24h is an exercise in close reading. Here is what I mean: you are doing a close reading of a text when you read it slowly and you try to read out of the text, not into the text. When I say to read out of the text, I mean that we need to analyze a text within its own context, instead of looking at it through the lens of our own worldview. This way, you avoid reading your values into the ancient Greek texts, which have their own values. When we read into the text, we are assuming that the ancient Greeks had the same values that we have. When we read out of the text, by contrast, we are trying to learn their values, which are often quite different from ours. In any case, we must be objective in trying to figure out what their values were. We have to rely on their texts and on the language that shapes their texts, and so their language needs to be translated as accurately as possible into English. The translations that I provide in the book h24h are meant to show a special degree of accuracy. That is why the English of my translations in h24h is sometimes harder to read than the English of the translations you find in the Sourcebook. Here is another way I can put it: my translations of the original Greek texts in h24h are good for slow reading, whereas most of the translations in the Sourcebook are better for fast reading.

§9. You might be tempted to ask: what was the basis for choosing which texts to read slowly? My answer would be: the 245 texts that I have chosen include examples of some of the greatest moments in Greek literature. But then I would add: in a parallel universe, I could have chosen a completely different set of texts that would also include some of the greatest moments in this literature. My choices, then, are simply points of departure leading to other choices for slow reading.  

Appendix I: On h24h and the Sourcebook

I quote here the first three paragraphs of h24h, which give background on this book and also on the Sourcebook:

The Ancient Greek Hero in 24 Hours is based on a course that I have taught at Harvard University ever since the late 1970s. This course, "Concepts of the Hero in Classical Greek Civilization," now renamed "The Ancient Greek Hero," centers on selected readings of texts, all translated from the original Greek into English. The texts include the Homeric Iliad and Odyssey; the Hesiodic Theogony and Works and Days; selected songs of Sappho and Pindar; selections from the Histories of Herodotus; the Agamemnon, Libation Bearers, and Eumenides of Aeschylus; the Oedipus Tyrannus and Oedipus at Colonus of Sophocles; the Hippolytus and Bacchae of Euripides; and the Apology and Phaedo of Plato. Also included are selections from Pausanias and Philostratus. These texts are supplemented by pictures, taken mostly from Athenian vase paintings. Copies of those pictures are shown in Hour 7.

The texts I have just listed are available free of charge in the online Sourcebook of Original Greek Texts Translated into English [available here on the project website], which I have edited with the help of fellow teachers and researchers. The process of editing this Sourcebook is an ongoing project that I hope will outlast my own lifetime. All the translations in this online Sourcebook are free from copyright restrictions. That is because the translations belong either to me, to other authors who have waived copyright, or to authors who died in a time that precedes any further application of copyright. The texts of these translations in the Sourcebook are periodically reviewed and modified, and the modifications are indicated by way of special formatting designed to show the differences between the original translator’s version and the modified version.

The Ancient Greek Hero in 24 Hours is divided into five parts. The number of hours dedicated to each part is tightened up as the argumentation intensifies, and the hours themselves get shorter. Part I, taking up Hours 1 through 12, is primarily about heroes as reflected in the oldest surviving forms of ancient Greek epic and lyric poetry. Part II, Hours 13 through 15, is about heroes as reflected in a variety of prose media. Part III, Hours 16 through 21, is about heroes in ancient Greek tragedy. Part IV, Hours 22-23, is about heroes as reflected in two dialogues of Plato. And Part V, confined to Hour 24, is about the hero as a transcendent concept. In two of the Hours, there are additional sections. Hour 7 is followed by sections numbered Hour 7a, Hour 7b, Hour 7c, and so on; similarly, Hour 8 is followed by sections numbered Hour 8a, Hour 8b, Hour 8c, and so on. These sections will add more hours of reading, and the reader may choose to postpone them in the course of a first reading.

Appendix II: An Introduction to Self-Assessment Exercises

There are two types of self-assessment exercises for each Hour of the 24 Hours of “Heroes.” These exercises involve thinking about and responding to two sets of questions. The questions in the first set of questions are about the content of what you have been reading in the translations of the Greek texts assigned for each given Hour and in the e-book,  The Ancient Hero in 24 Hours, while the questions in the second set are based on close readings of selections from these Greek texts. These selections are labeled as Text A, Text B, Text C, and so on, in each Hour. Examples of such close readings, averaging ten Texts in each Hour, are provided in the e-book The Ancient Greek Hero in 24 Hours, henceforth abbreviated as h24h. If you want to track your score in answering the questions in these two types of self-assessment exercises, here is the rationale. The answers to the questions in the Annotation Exercises carry 60% of the overall score of your self-assessment, while the answers to the content-questions carry 40%. Participants who wish to earn a Certificate of Mastery need to complete all self-assessment exercises by the end date (12/31/13) with a combined average score of 50% or greater. Please note that this self-assessment score is not a course-grade, and it does not count as the part of any course-grade. It is simply a way for you to measure your own pace in mastering basic facts and thoughts about the ancient Greek hero. Both the content-questions and the questions in the Annotation Exercises will be marked with a clock icon under Courseware. Please note, however, that self-assessments are not timed.

 


Idealized Schedule for CB 22.1x "The Ancient Greek Hero," Fall 2013

Participants seeking to maximize opportunities for discussion with readers working at the same pace should follow the schedule below, which is synchronized with the associated courses at Harvard University. Although we are sharing this "ideal" schedule, we want to emphasize two things: 1) new participants are welcome at all times, and 2) we honor the participation of those working at any level of engagement--including those who may want to explore select portions of content. As previously stated, participants who are working towards an edX/HarvardX certificate may work at their own pace to complete all self-assessments by Dec 31.

September 4-8: Hours 0 and 1

Reading:

  • Read “Introduction to the Book” and “Introduction to Homeric Poetry” in The Ancient Greek Hero in 24 Hours (h24h)
  • Slow reading in h24h: Hour 0 Texts A–H and Hour 1 Texts A–C
  • Fast reading in Sourcebook: Iliad scroll I

Self-assessment:

  • Answer the online Hour 1 content-questions and complete the Annotation Exercise

September 9-15: Hours 2 and 3                                          

Reading:

  • Slow reading in h24h: Hour 2 Texts A–E and Hour 3 Texts A–F
  • Fast reading in Sourcebook: Iliad scrolls III, VI, IX, XV (306–404, 592–746), XVI, and XVII (1–69, 188–232, 366–455, 673–751)

Self-assessment:

  • Answer the online Hour 2 and 3 content-questions and complete the Annotation Exercises

September 16-22: Hours 4 and 5                                        

Reading:

  • Slow reading in h24h: Hour 4 Texts A–J and Hour 5 Texts A–M
  • Fast reading in Sourcebook: Iliad scrolls XVIII–XX, XXI (1–135, 227–390), and XXII–XXIV

Self-assessment:

  • Answer the online Hour 4 and 5 content-questions and complete the Annotation Exercises

September 23-29: Hours 6 and 7                                        

Reading:

  • Slow reading in h24h: Hour 6 Texts A–G and Hour 7 Texts A–G
  • Fast reading in Sourcebook: Iliad scrolls I–XVI (some scrolls are being read a second time)

Self-assessment:

  • Answer the online Hour 6 and 7 content-questions and complete the Annotation Exercises

September 30-October 6: Hours 8 and 9                            

Reading:

  • Slow reading in h24h: Hour 8 Texts A–N and Hour 9 Texts A–J
  • Fast reading in Sourcebook: Iliad scrolls XVII–XXIV and Odyssey scrolls i–viii

Self-assessment:

  • Answer the online Hour 8 and 9 content-questions and complete the Annotation Exercises

October 7-15: Hours 10 and 11

Reading:

  • Slow reading in h24h: Hour 10 Texts A–E and Hour 11 Texts A–R
  • Fast reading in Sourcebook: Odyssey scrolls ix–xxiv

Self-assessment:

  • Answer the online Hour 10 and 11 content-questions and complete the Annotation Exercises

October 16-20: Hour 12                                                      

Reading:

  • Slow reading in h24h: Hour 12 Texts A–M
  • Fast reading in Sourcebook: Hesiod Theogony 1–115 and Works & Days 1–286

Self-assessment:

  • Answer the online Hour 12 content-questions and complete the Annotation Exercise

October 21-27: Hours 13 and 14                                         

Reading:

  • Slow reading in h24h: Hour 13 Texts A–L and Hour 14 Texts A–Q and
  • Fast reading in Sourcebook: Herodotus Selections Hour 13, and Philostratus Hērōikos

Self-assessment:

  • Answer the online Hour 13 and 14 content-questions and complete the Annotation Exercises

October 28-November 3: Hours 15 and 16

Reading:

  • Slow reading in h24h: Hour 15 Texts A–M and Hour 16 Texts A–G
  • Fast reading in Sourcebook: Herodotus Selections Hour 15, and Aeschylus Agamemnon

Self-assessment:

  • Answer the online Hour 15 and 16 content-questions and complete the Annotation Exercises

November 4-10: Hours 17 and 18                                       

Reading:

  • Slow reading in h24h: Hour 17 Texts A–H and Hour 18 Texts A–K
  • Fast reading in Sourcebook: Aeschylus Libation Bearers and Eumenides and Sophocles Oedipus at Colonus Oedipus Tyrannos

Self-assessment:

  • Answer the online Hour 17 and 18 content-questions and complete the Annotation Exercises

November 11-17: Hours 19 and 20                                      

Reading:

  • Slow reading in h24h: Hour 19 Texts A–H and Hour 20 Texts A–L
  • Fast reading in Sourcebook: Sophocles Oedipus Tyrannos and Euripides Hippolytus

Self-assessment:

  • Answer the online Hour 19 and 20 content-questions and complete the Annotation Exercises

November 18-24: Hours 21 and 22                                     

Reading:

  • Slow reading in h24h: Hour 21 Texts A–I and Hour 22 Texts A1–D
  • Fast reading in Sourcebook: Euripides Bacchae and Plato Apology of Socrates

Self-assessment:

  • Answer the online Hour 21 and 22 content-questions and complete the Annotation Exercises

November 25-December 1: Hour 23                                  

Reading:

  • Slow reading in h24h: Hour 23 Texts A through H
  • Fast reading in Sourcebook: Plato Phaedo

Self-assessment:

  • Answer the online Hour 23 content-questions and complete the Annotation Exercise

December 2-8: Hour 24 and Beyond                                 

Reading:

  • Slow reading in h24h: Hour 24 Texts A–J

Self-assessment:

  • Answer the online Hour 24 content-questions and complete the Annotation Exercise

 


Notes to "Advice for Participants" above

1 Friedrich Nietzsche was appointed Professor of Greek Literature at the University of Basel when he was just 25 years old and had not even completed his PhD. But he had already published a series of articles displaying full mastery of the philological method as it was practiced in Bonn where he was trained by Friedrich Ritschl. In April 1869 Nietzsche arrived at Basel, and 1872 marked the appearance of his highly philosophical book The Birth of Tragedy from the Spirit of Music (Die Geburt der Tragödie aus dem Geiste der Musik), the publication of which alienated Nietzsche from the philological community. Nevertheless, he was to become one of the most famous and influential Hellenists of modern times.

2 The translation here is adapted (with only slight changes) from R. J. Hollingdale, Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche, Daybreak: Thoughts on the Prejudices of Morality (Cambridge, 1982), 5. The original German text: Friedrich Nietzsche, Morgenröthe. Nachgelassene Fragmente, Anfang 1880 bis Frühjahr 1881. Nietzsche Werke V.1, ed. G. Colli and M. Montinari (Berlin, 1971), 9.